If you were like me and hoping your copy of Frampton Comes Alive or Blonde on Blonde was going to finance your next trip or at least get you on Pawn Stars, guess again.

According to the Record Collector magazine, the distinction for most expensive album goes to an acetate recorded by John Lennon's pre-Beatles band, The Quarrymen. Their 1958 demo of That'll Be the Day backed with In Spite of All the Danger, is valued at more than $319,000. The rest of the Top 10 is dominated by recordings by The Beatles and The Sex Pistols, who, along with The Quarrymen hold nine of the Top 10 slots. Queen occupies the remaining slot.

Record Collector magazine's top 10 highest prices are:

1) The Quarrymen - "That'll Be the Day" b/w "In Spite of All the Danger" (1958, acetate) - $319,000

2) The Quarrymen - 1981 replica of "That'll Be the Day" b/w "In Spite of All the Danger" - $16,000

3) Sex Pistols - "God Save the Queen" b/w "No Feelings" (1977 acetate) - $16,000

4) Sex Pistols - "God Save the Queen" b/w "No Feelings" (1977 - A&M AMS 7284) - $12,700

5) Sex Pistols - "Anarchy in the U.K." b/w "No Fun" (1977 acetate) - $11,000

6) The Beatles - The Beatles (White Album - 1968 Apple PMC/PCS 7067/8) - $11,000

7) The Beatles - Please Please Me (1963, Parlophone PCS 3042) - $8,000

8) Queen - "Bohemian Rhapsody" b/w "I'm In Love With My Car" (1978 EMI 2375) - $8,000

9) The Beatles - "Love Me Do" b/w "P.S. I Love You" (1962 Parlophone 45-R 4949) - $8,000

10) Sex Pistols - "Anarchy in the U.K." (1976 acetate) - $8,000